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Stone Path Review

Hello everyone! Just a quick post. We are changing the name of Stone Path Review to Stone Path Review & Magazine and have a new website at http://www.stonepathmagazine.com.

We will be posting more selective and personal writings and photography and working on a redesign. More information to come.

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Poem – Renewal

The dirt path changed to stone
and as time passed I lost my place.

Emerging from one realm
to another this one was foreign.

And yet familiar if I closed my eyes,
like some part of me crossed here before.

And yet distant, the remote connection
either passed or not arrived.

Between two possibilities I chose
to be the reincarnation of my

previous self, to retain the experience
and returned to the world at hand.

Stone Path Review Update

The following newsletter was sent out today regarding Stone Path Review, our artistic journal and our publishing company, Enso Press, LLC.


As we close out 2014 having completed our 3rd year with 12 issues, we have been looking back and of course looking forward. After hard and honest thinking about Stone Path Review specifically and in general the Enso Press, LLC business, we have decided to not publish the quarterly journal in 2015. The time and dedication it requires and deserves to craft a quarterly journal is becoming a bit much, and we would like to step back and refocus our creativity.

The Stone Path Review website will remain and be active as new artwork will be posted there from time to time. We will still conduct interviews that are important and timely, but the quarterly journal will be on-hold.

For Enso Press, LLC, the other projects will keep moving forward as more time will be dedicated to them. This includes film production (Around Here) and collections of poetry (Beyond the Border Kingdom, Students Guide to Zen) among other things we have under wraps.

Additionally the better half of Stone Path Review, Patricia, will be concentrating on her studio and photography. News and exciting updates will be posted to http://www.twistedrootstudios.com

To the artists who have trusted your work with us, we cannot thank you enough. You are why we started Stone Path Review in the first place, and have made the past 3-years a memorable journey and an experience we will take with to our next projects.

We have quite a few open submissions and I will be gracefully rejecting them with a summary of the above and our gratitude.

Future updates and communications will also come through this newsletter as well as the Stone Path Review website and our Facebook page. All links are included below.

Stone Path Review: http://www.stonepathreview.org
Enso Press: http://ensopress.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stone-Path-Review/273709699341934?ref=hl
Latest Issue: http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/823370?__r=322616

Fall 2014 Issue of Stone Path Review has been published

The Fall 2014 issue of Stone Path Review is now available for reading at http://www.stonepathreview.com and http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/823370?__r=322616

Interview with: Peter Vircks
Poetry by: Amanda Barusch, Anuja Ghimire, Deonte Osayande, Gary Glauber, Lisa Megraw, Ralph Monday, Robert Henschel, Jr., Rochelle Natt, Salvatore Folisi, Samantha Tetangco, Wendy Brown-Baez
Short Story by: John Richmond
Paintings by: Margaret Karmazin
Photography by: Kristy Johnson, Louis Staeble, Rohnda Monroy
Photography for written pieces by: Twisted Root Studios


Stone Path Review Fall 2014

Stone Path Review: Stone Path Review Fall 2014

Issue twelve of the artistic journal Stone Path Review featuring an interview with a musician, poetry, short story, paintings, and images of people and nature. The focus is what we harvest and what we become.

Find out more on MagCloud

Summer 2014 Introduction

We celebrate summer, the time of growth, with an issue packed full of beautiful, insightful, and thought-provoking writing; photography about life, the daily moments near us, and an interview with a farmer.

As life continues to accelerate and we become more integrated with technology, what does it mean to be living?

I watch the pond in our backyard for hours, at different times of the day, through everything that nature throws at me. The activity of many creatures – ducks, red-winged blackbirds, muskrats, and ravens – follow the amount of sunlight, moonlight, rain, snow, and other influences. This world of nature, of beings interacting directly with their environment, involves adaptation and a survival instinct for themselves and their offspring. They have a path and a purpose.

At a moment before the sun reaches over the treetops, my only thought is of nothing. All of the sounds emerging from this pond cover me like my Winnie the Pooh security blanket from childhood, and I am able to let go. At that moment, I feel something that has become foreign, that has become elusive – peace. It has taken time, experience, patience, awareness, and the desire to grow and change, to get here. And the journey is still on going.

What is living?

We are born into this world with a physical body and metaphysical being of a mind and a soul. These pieces come together and create the human that learns to crawl, walk, and exist within the space. That path is comprised of many strings, and each string has many threads. At any point, we can jump from one string to another, and from one thread to the next and the life we experience changes. This jump can be a conscious choice, influenced and caused by the environment, or a shove. How we react to that change determines the experience and how we live. Do we embrace change, or run from what is unfamiliar? And what do we take away from that change?

What is living then?

Each experience is the chance for growth. Whether we initiate the change and take control or react to what we find and against all odds, blind to outcomes, we forge ahead, we can continue to build the person we are now, and who we are growing into. Through questioning and cultivation, we find the person within that has always been there, that we were born with. Living is being our true self, becoming our true self, and choosing to grow.

Stone Path Review Artistic Journal

Stone Path Review Artistic Journal

Summer issue of Stone Path Review now available

Volume 3, issue 11 of Stone Path Review is now available for your reading pleasure.

This issue features an interview with a goat farmer, Beth Donovan; photography by A.J. Huffman, Aaron Bowen, Brian Biggs, Claire Ibarra, Galen Faison, and John Sikkila; and writing by David Rutter, J.B. Mulligan, Jeffrey Willius, John Michael Flynn, Kathleen Lindstrom, Kathryn Hujda, Michael Gould, Michael K. Gause, and Sarah Nour.

 

Stone Path Review Summer 2014

Stone Path Review: Stone Path Review Summer 2014

Latest issue of the artistic journal Stone Path Review featuring an interview with a goat farmer, poetry, short stories, and images of people and nature.

Find out more on MagCloud

Latest Stone Path Review Newsletter

News and events from artists and friends of Stone Path Review. Newsletter can be read here.

Here is a link to all previous newsletters.

Stone Path Review Artistic Journal

Stone Path Review Artistic Journal

Latest Stone Path Review Newsletter

The latest Stone Path Review newsletter was just published. Highlights include an upcoming poetry collection by Daniel Flanagan and updates on a new film we are supporting – Hybrid Vigor.  Newsletter can be read here.

Stone Path Review Artistic Journal

Stone Path Review Artistic Journal

Stone Path Review – May 2014 Newsletter

The latest newsletter from Enso Press and Stone Path Review can be read online here at Mail Chimp.

Better yet, please consider joining our mailing list to review all of the updates regarding Enso Press, Stone Path Review, Stone Path Films, and Tessta Rangeet.

Stone Path Review Artistic Journal

On Paths

The following is the introduction I wrote for the Spring 2014 issue of Stone Path Review.


Welcome to the Spring 2014 issue of Stone Path Review. Our primary mission is to present art that delves into life and path in life, the route and direction we take, and the struggle and triumph we all endure. The path is often dark before the full light emerges.

Where we are going and what tomorrow will look like is rarely known today. Sometimes tomorrow arrives, and we wonder how did I get here. There are many variables and external influences pushing and pulling against you. These directly affect what constitutes that path, and what tomorrow will contain.

That path, that thread, is often dark. Comprised of a myriad of emotions it saturates the mind, filling the soul, and pushes us to breaking points that we are unaware of. When we get through the experience, what happens next is essential in determining where this leads, as the path we are on is never static. It is constantly changing in response to our state of being, the environment we are within, and how we respond to that environment.

Across the distance, from where I sit in a rocking chair, the space is full with trees, hills, small valleys, and marshland. I tell myself I can touch the sun. I convince myself there is no distance and there is no time. Such is the path I attempt to define while mired in the daily chaos I struggle to avoid.

The path we travel is toward something. It can be anything we seek to attain or obtain from this limited time we have chosen. Here I call this the source, or a bright light. Some schools of thought call this enlightenment or salvation. The end goal seeks to be the culmination of our experiences and a reason for what we have endured. It is a light in the distance, where no straight path or direct route exists, but it shines regardless.

Each day filled with doubt, loneliness, or a sense of loss or purpose. The path is stormy and there never seems to be enough time to reach the source before the sun disappears and the day is over. And this begins again the next day as we continue to navigate that path – sometimes not realizing the answers we are looking for have quietly entered our mind and our being.

Even when we see the light and feel good about the direction there are storms building. Perhaps we do not believe the goodness, even in small doses, a lotus growing in middle of a burned field. There seems to be something hiding and lurking in the background. While it is simple to look the other way and ignore what is still an opportunity, these challenges further the growing experience building the person you are now and will become shortly, as each second passes.

What is most important is how we respond and react to each moment and what we want from this limited time – this determines the shape and direction of our path.

There is goodness and light beyond the dark. There is something more beyond what we see now and we can make it through knowing this. The more we experience gives more options as we choose pieces to keep in building the person within and the path to follow. The more positive the path becomes, the more positive the impact on people and nature around us.