woods

Updated John Haines story

A few years ago I wrote a story inspired by John Haines titled “A Walk in the Woods With John Haines”.  As his words and thoughts continue to provide guidance over the years, I return to this piece and update the images and feelings to reflect the experiences that have defined me.

Poem – Woods

In the woods
we take the worn path
of hard dirt and decaying leaves
following the recent activities
of coyotes.

Consistent and plentiful rain
has filled in empty spaces
with the silent guardians
reaching to the morning sun.

Morning Sun

Morning Sun

Snowshoeing on 03/02/14

Snowshoeing on 03/02/14

I follow the packed trail others before me have taken. Winding through pine, poplar, and birch, it hugs the rocky shoreline. Up and down over boulders and outcroppings, the trial heads deep into the woods before I stop. An abandoned building overlooks the lake. Trees tower over the skewed roof and poke through glassless windows. Floorboards long ago rotted and disappeared, leaving nothing to prevent the forest from overtaking the cabin on the woods.

I continue north along the same trail which dips into a small frozen valley. In warmer months, a creek would fill this space and empty into Lake Superior. Now it is ice beneath 3 feet of snow. Trees bow in half ellipticals from each side and I pass beneath, careful not to break tree limbs, catch my backpack, or otherwise disturb what is here, and continue up the other side.

With empty and open mind I hear the voiceless tree and gently place my hand on its trunk. Eyes closed. When opened I see the light drawn from before this projections and boundaries existed. I see the nothing that gave birth.


Cabin in the Woods

Cabin in the Woods

Trail Building and Fall

Fall is the perfect time of year for building trails through the woods.  Most tree leaves have fallen, the intense underbrush of summer, including small trees, weeds, and tall grasses, have wilted.  The trail emerges and you can more easily find where you left off the previous fall.  Passing by birch, pine, oak, and maple this is nature in all its forms.  From the deer runs zig-zagging everywhere, to the seasonal creek that is now dry, to the raven flying so close you can hear the wings flapping, this makes everything else worthwhile.

In preparation for winter and snowshoeing, I spent the past two weekends installing new trail markers, making sure existing can be seen clearly, and cleaning fallen trees and other debris.  Now is also the time to scope out where the next spur trail will be installed.

Time Away

Deep into the northern woods, beneath the blue sky, near full moon, and lush pine trees, balance is finally being restored. After an Alaskan Amber, Joline begins to emerge and I finally continue the story that I have been working on for over 15-years. This current work will provide more of a background story for Joline, and who she is in a more basic, and pure state of mind.

Poem – Fracture 56

the winged sun
whispers light
the winged sun
expels white dust.

and the morning dew
cold to our touch
and the deer trail
leads us deeper into the woods.

subtle April needles green mingling
with ancient blue from an artist’s palette.

the ravens echo mocks other birds
a ploy and trick to conceal its presence,
or the thoughtful playing as the sun rises
and the black wings extend.

over the tree top
a murder gathers and
the prairie grasses slither
in the afternoon wind.

in unison with green pine,
blue spruce and light birch
a voice grows to perfect pitch
and grandfather speaks.

another day has passed.

2013 Poetry Month #7 – Solitude Late at Night in the Woods

The following poem is written by Robert Bly. He is considered one of the greatest writers of our time, and it was a challenge to select one piece form his 60-plus years of writing. This piece is from the collection “Eating the Honey of Words: New and Selected Poems”, published in 1999 by Perennial.


Solitude Late at Night in the Woods

I
The body is like a November birch facing the full moon
And reaching into the cold heavens.
In these trees there is no ambition, no sodden body, no leaves,
Nothing but bare trunks climbing like cold fire!

II
My last walk in the trees has come. At dawn
I must return to the trapped fields,
To the obedient earth.
The trees shall be reaching all the winter.

III
It is a joy to walk in the bare woods.
The moonlight is not broken by the heavy leaves.
The leaves are down, and touching the soaked earth,
Giving off the odor that partridges love.

Retreat – Challenges and Setbacks

An update on the wildlife retreat we have been working on the past 2-years.  The first phase is done and we will take the winter off and enjoy the trees and bird songs.  Phase two, which will be prairie grass restoration, starts in the spring of next year.  Along with the joy of the various animals, birds, trees, sights, and sounds, we have had to deal with the darker side of humanity.  Twice, during hunting season, we have had remains of dear left in various states on the retreat.  The first time it happened was with snow covering the ground and most of the remains were hidden and not much we could do.  This past weekend was a different story.  It has been warm for MN this time of year and we have no snow.  While I will not go into detail, the site was pretty gruesome.  Even the county sheriff and DNR representative I am working with were bothered by the situation.

Where we are there are plenty of predators, including coyote, of which we know there are two packs roaming around in the dark hours.  Something we have to be aware of and careful with is our dog.  Now there is additional food for them, that will bring them closer to our space.  According to the people I have talked with, since this on private property, our only option is to bury or burn the remains.  We will be opting for the burn, and as such, will do this as respectfully as we can.  I will be writing a poem about the experience and the results of what we will look at as a sacrifice and bring into this symbols of the elements.

Retreat Building Continues

We have spent the last 4-weekends finishing a retreat and wildlife refuge up north.  This is a stepping stone toward our long-term plans to begin prairie restoration and maintain a healthy forest through sustainable practices.

Work completed so far includes a trail system for access to the deep woods, selection of the prairie project location, pole barn, and an outdoor primitive shower.

With so much time and energy being spent, writing has taken a back-seat, and that is being kind.  When this first phase is done, I hope to start blogging more about the experience and the wildlife that enjoys the refuge.  When we start prairie restoration next year, the experience will be cataloged here with photos and detail of the deep learning curve we will be going through, along with the mistakes.